Mountain of Hope Organization

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Our Mission

The Mountain of Hope Foundation is dedicated to furthering educational and employment opportunities in southern West Virginia. The non-profit corporation was formed on May 15, 2010 and is managed by an Advisory Board of Directors that is comprised of volunteers originally from Mt. Hope, W.Va. with representation from local businesses and churches. The president of the Foundation is the Reverend Charles McKenney. The Foundation's overall philosophy is grounded in 3 principles:

  • I. Unity of effort results from coming together with a common purpose
  • II. Progress results from people working together regardless of race, religion or educational attainment
  • III. Success is brought about through staying together in our common cause.

A Word from the President

What a joy, what peace, what friends and then you top it off with true friendship love; that is how our organization and purpose was formed. I love what the Mountain of Hope Organization stands for, what the organization has done and will continue to do in the future.

Pastor C.W. McKenney, President

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"Remembering them all" with Siltix marker dedication

MOUNT HOPE — "I just want to begin by remembering them all," an emotional Jack Spadaro said at the outset of his remarks Friday at the 55th anniversary of the New River Company Siltix Mine explosion.
After that, he solemnly read aloud the names of the seven miners who perished on July 23, 1966:

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Mountain of Hope Organization 2021 Scholarship Recipients

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In the News

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Mountain of Hope Program Explores the Past to Better the Future

On Sunday evening, members of the Mount Hope community and the interested public gathered in the Gov. Hulett C. Smith Theater at Tamarack to listen to a discussion about the southern West Virginia town's racial history.

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Football as a Catalyst for Change in Mount Hope, West Virginia

Acts of violence and protests resisting racial integration were features in many American communities in the 1950s and 60s. A tiny town in the coalfields of South Central West Virginia appears to have been a notable exception.

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Oral Histories Recount Hopeful Integration of Mount Hope High School

"We were told some of the students would not be coming back to Mount Hope. Some would be going to other schools in the county - Oak Hill High, Fayetteville," she said.

Football as a Catalyst for Change


Race and Class in WV Coalfields